• mixed-media monotype on Lanaquarelle paper, var.ed. of 5,
    9.125x11.75 (image)

    Jambo,Tanzania, celebrates Tanzanian wildlife, and champions the importance of preserving environments where it is still possible for these magnificent animals to live together, naturally wild and free. The exhibition of over 50 mixed-media monotypes, was inspired by the artist's hiking and jeep safari in Tanzania.

    Roar by Marian Osher, ©2014
    801,600
  • mixed-media monotype on Lanaquarelle paper, var.ed. of 5,
    9x11.5 (image)
    Cheetah Camouflage by Marian Osher, ©2014
    804,600
  • mixed-media monotype on Lanaquarelle paper, var.ed. of 5,
    9.125x11.75 (image)
    Sleeping Leopard by Marian Osher, ©2014
    802,600
  • mixed-media monotype on painted canvas, var.ed. of 5,
    14 x 11(canvas size)
    Hungry Giraffe by Marian Osher, ©2014
    476,600
  • mixed-media monotype on Lanaquarelle paper, var.ed. of 5,
    11.75x9.125 (image)
    Strolling Giraffe by Marian Osher, ©2014
    488,600
  • mixed-media monotype on Lanaquarelle paper, var.ed. of 5,
    9x11.5 (image)
    Giraffe Family by Marian Osher, ©2014
    815,600
  • mixed-media monotype on Lanaquarelle paper, var.ed. of 5,
    9x11.5 (image)
    Two Pumbas by Marian Osher, ©2014
    817,600
  • mixed-media monotype on Lanaquarelle paper, var.ed. of 5,
    9x11.5 (image)
    Baboon Family by Marian Osher, ©2014
    808,600
  • mixed-media monotype on painted canvas, var.ed. of 5,
    14 x 11(canvas size)
    Trio of Baboons by Marian Osher, ©2014
    476,600
  • mixed-media monotype on Lanaquarelle paper, var.ed. of 5,
    9x11.5 (image)
    Grazing with Grace by Marian Osher, ©2014
    792,600
  • mixed-media monotype on Lanaquarelle paper, var.ed. of 5,
    9.125x11.75 (image)
    DikDik and DikDik by Marian Osher, ©2014
    776,600
  • mixed-media monotype on Lanaquarelle paper, var.ed. of 5,
    9.125x11.75 (image)
    Ostrich Pride by Marian Osher, ©2014
    784,600
  • mixed-media monotype on Lanaquarelle paper, var.ed. of 5,
    9.125x11.75 (image)
    Looking at You by Marian Osher, ©2014
    790,600
  • mixed-media monotype on Lanaquarelle paper, var.ed. of 5,
    11.75x9.125 (image)
    Little Egret by Marian Osher, ©2014
    463,600
  • mixed-media monotype on Lanaquarelle paper, var.ed. of 5,
    11.5x9 (image)
    The Elephant’s Child by Marian Osher, ©2014
    483,600
  • mixed-media monotype on painted canvas, var.ed. of 5,
    11 x 14(canvas size)
    Zebra Stripes by Marian Osher, ©2014
    753,600
  • mixed-media monotype on Lanaquarelle paper, var.ed. of 5,
    9x11.5 (image)
    Agama Lizard by Marian Osher, ©2014
    808,600
  • Jambo, Tanzania

    I am a painter and printmaker, with a strong feeling of commitment to environmental and wildlife issues. Following an enlightening safari in Tanzania with my husband last summer, I was inspired to create artwork for an art exhibition at the Washington Printmakers Gallery about Tanzanian wildlife. Our jeep and hiking safari, guided by a Masai tribesman, took us to Tarangire, Lake Manyara, Ngorongoro Crater and the Serengeti wildlife conservation areas.

    We saw a veritable aphabet of Tanzanian wildlife–birds, baboons, cape buffalo, a cheetah, dikdiks, elephants giraffes, Grants gazelles, hartebeests, hippopotomues, impalas, lions, leopards, lizards, monkeys, ostriches a rhinoceros, Thomson's gazelles, wildebeests, warthogs, and zebras. We experienced the thrill of seeing wildlife, as they are meant to be, in their natural habitats living their lives with their animal families and tribes.

    But the thrill of sighting a rhinoceros transformed into shock when our guide told us there were only 13 left in the Serengeti. We also learned through the excellent education programs in the Tanzanian conservation parks about the challenges that have threatened the survival of African wildlife. African wildlife has been threatened by poachers, cyberhunters and trophy hunters. Elephants and rhinoceros have been killed for their tusks. Fear of diseases carried by the tsetse fly has historically provided ‘justification’ for reduction of the African wildlife population.

    Jambo Tanzania celebrates Tanzanian wildlife and champions the importance of preserving environments where it is still possible for these magnificent animals to live together, naturally wild and free.

    Our experience in Tanzania was truly an inspiring and lifechanging experience. I will always remember the warmth and friendliness of the Tanzanian people that we met on our trip.

    Media

    Creating the Monotype: I drew and painted my image on a mylar plate, using a combination of water-soluble media. Next, I transfered the image to dampened paper with my etching press. The monotype is dried over night under weights.

    Hand embossing: To add dimension, I hand embossed parts of each print. After I decided which areas of the print I wanted to emboss, I used a stylus to score the edges of shapes on the front side of the print. Then I turned the print over and used a burnisher to hand emboss the shape that I wanted to raise.

    Painted canvas: Some of the monotypes in the Jambo Tanzanie were mixed media-monotypes on painted canvas. For the canvas presentation only, I tore off the white border around the print with a deckled edge ruler. I painted the canvas using a subtle combination of colors to complement the print and relate to the colors of the Tanzanian dirt roads. I cut an acid free foam board to a size that will allow the deckled edge of the print to extend slightly over the foam board. The foam board is lightly filed, sealed with Golden GAC 100 medium and painted on the edge to match the color of the canvas. The print is sealed with an isolation coat of diluted Golden Soft Gel medium and is mounted with the same medium, undiluted, onto the foam board. The foam board is mounted on the canvas. The canvas and the print are then treated with three final varnishes to protect and preserve the artwork without glass.

    Framed Work: To vary the presentation for the viewer, some of the embossed monotypes were matted and framed under glass instead of mounting them on painted canvas.

    Jambo,Tanzania, celebrates Tanzanian wildlife, and champions the importance of preserving environments where it is still possible for these magnificent animals to live together, naturally wild and free. The exhibition of over 50 mixed-media monotypes, was inspired by the artist's hiking and jeep safari in Tanzania.

    Jambo Tanzania Artists Statement by Marian Osher, ©2014
    661,909
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